How to Tie: Pat’s Rubber Leg

In this week’s “How to Tie” video feature, Skyler Hardman ties one of the most simple, yet effective stoneflies on the market today, Pat’s Rubber Leg.


Difficulty: Easy

Stoneflies are a constant trout snack, especially during the warmer months. As big stoneflies are kicked up or begin to hatch, they will likely find themselves as a meal. Whether it is big salmon fly hatches out west or smaller river stones, Pat’s Rubber Leg is a fly that will always perform. The variability and simplicity of this fly makes it a true guide fly and one that few anglers will leave out of their fly box.

Tying Pat’s Rubber Leg is as easy as they come. Matching the color and size of the stoneflies in your river may be the most difficult part. The brown and black classic color is one that will work on nearly any river with stoneflies, but some anglers will tie these flies in purple and other attractor colors. Switching lead wire in the ingredients of this fly to a non-toxic wire is a choice that each tyer can make on their own, but is highly encouraged. From novice to expert, Pat’s Rubber Leg is not only a fun fly to tie, but will produce on the water like few can compare.

Fishing a Chubby Chernobyl with a Pat’s Rubber Leg dropper on small streams during the summer is one of my favorite ways to spend a day. Confidence on the water is crucial and fishing a fly that is as simple as can be, yet extremely effective will provide that. Nothing beats catching a fish on your own fly and Pat’s Rubber Leg is a perfect spot to start for beginners or younger kids that may be interested in getting into the sport.

Ingredients:

  • Hook: Dai-riki 4x Long streamer
  • Thread: Danville 70 Denier Flymaster Plus
  • Lead: .020 lead wire
  • Legs/Tail/Antennae: Brown Flex Floss (Spirit River Medium)
  • Body: Black/Coffee Variegated chenille Medium

Now you know how to tie Pat’s Rubber Leg!

Video and ingredients courtesy of Skyler Hardman.

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